Board of Directors

International Hydrofoil Society…
The People at IHS

SCROLL DOWN FOR BIOGRAPHIES OF PROMINENT MEMBERS

BBS – Post or Read BoD Messages on our Bulletin Board (The General Administrative) area is reserved for BoD members use to conduct planning for future IHS activites and preparation for the Societies BoD meetings. The actual BoD meetings are open to all members to attend. Click Here to be notified automatically when new messages are posted to the BBS

Announcements (The BoD will announce Upcoming Meetings, People in the News, Current Events, Hydrofoils For Sale/Wanted to Buy, and New Publications) (26 Aug 04

(Names and E-Mail Links to IHS Directors, Officers, and Former Presidents)

(Last Update 10/4/2017 )

Board of Directors Present

“bio” means scroll down this page for a biographical sketch.

Mark Bebar (bio)

Harry Larsen (bio)

Joel Billingsley (bio)

George Jenkins (bio)
Resigned & Replaced by:

David Patch (bio)

John R. Meyer (bio)
Deceased & Replaced by:

Brian Stone

Martin Grimm (bio)
Leigh McCue-Weil (bio) Resigned & Replaced by:

Bob Roddy

Joel Roberts (bio)

Captain Frank Horn (bio)

Vellinga Ray (bio)

William White (bio)

John Monk (bio)
Resigned & Replaced by:

W. Scott Weidle (bio)

Board of Directors

2011-2014 2012-2015 2013-2016

Joel Billingsley (bio)

Mark Bebar (bio)

Harry Larsen (bio)
Martin Grimm (bio)

George Jenkins (bio) Resigned & Replaced by:

David Patch (bio)

John R. Meyer (bio)
Captain Frank Horn (bio)

Leigh McCue-Weil (bio)

Joel Roberts (bio)
John Monk (bio) Resigned & Replaced by:

W. Scott Weidle (bio)

Vellinga Ray (bio)

William White (bio)

Former Board of Directors
2008-2011
Joel Billingsley (bio)

2009-2012
Mark Bebar (bio)

2010-2013
Sumi Arima (bio)
Captain Frank Horn (bio)

Dennis Clark (bio)

John R. Meyer (bio)
John Monk (bio)

William Hockberger (bio)

Joel Roberts (bio)
Martin Grimm (bio)

George Jenkins (bio)

William White (bio)

Former Board of Directors
2002-2005

Jerry Gore (bio)

2003 – 2006

Mark R. Bebar (bio)

2004 – 2007

Sumi Arima (bio)

2008-2011
Joel Billingsley (bio)

2009-2012

Mark Bebar

Jim King (bio)

William Hockberger (bio)

Malin Dixon (bio)

Captain Frank Horn (bio)
Dennis Clark
Ken Spaulding (bio)

George Jenkins (bio)

John R. Meyer (bio)

John Monk (bio)
Bill Hockberger
John Monk (bio)

Dennis Clark (bio)

William White (bio)

Martin Grimm (bio)
George Jenkins

IHS Officers for 2013-2014

Former IHS Presidents

John Meyer
Mark Bebar, President

Baron Hanns von Schertel
Frank Horn, Treasurer

David Liang
Joel Roberts, Vice President

Peter Dorey
Joel Billingsley, Secretary

Dott Ing. Leopoldo Rodriquez

Ronald Adler
Robert J. Johnston
James L. Schuler
Dr. James R. Wilkins

Go Back to IHS Main Page
Selected Biographical Information

Adler, Ron – In 1982, CDR Ronald Adler was elected Vice-President of the IHS North American Chapter (NAC). Ron owned and managed a consulting firm specializing in naval logistics and mission analysis. His expertise in this field had contributed substantially to the US Navy?s advanced vehicle program. Ron continued to serve as Vice President of NAC until at the 1984 annual meeting he was elected NAC President. He served until Bob Johnston was elected President in 1985.

Arima, Sumi – Background: Graduate BSEE at Seattle University. Employed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in the Electrical Design Section, with a tour of duty at Bureau of Ships. Project engineer at Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Seattle from 1960 on HIGH POINT, FRESH-1, PLAINVIEW, and TUCUMCARI hydrofoil ship construction programs. Civilian head of Hydrofoil Special Trials Unit, David Taylor Naval Ship R&D Center from 1967 until retirement. Tested, refined, and demonstrated hydrofoil ships and systems. Charter member of IHS North American and served on the Board of Directors since 2001.

Mark Bebar is currently employed part-time as a Systems Engineer Professional Advisor at CSRA, Inc.  His principal assignments are in the areas of Early Stage Ship Design Process and High Speed Sealift Ship Technology. Mr. Bebar has an M.S. in Ocean Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1973) and a B.S. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering from Webb Institute (1970). He has over 45 years of experience, with 30 years focused specifically in the areas of total surface ship system research and development, design and acquisition support.

In his most recent position before retiring from the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) in January 2003 and joining CSC, he was Division Director for Future Ship and Force Architecture Concepts (NAVSEA 05D1). In this position, he was responsible for conducting whole-ship concept and feasibility studies and supporting assessment of competing ship design alternatives from pre-Milestone A through the Analysis of Alternative (AoA) phase. Since joining CSC-AMC, he has worked in the position of Professional Advisor, supporting various ship acquisition programs and projects, including Cobra Judy Replacement, LHA Replacement, High Speed Sealift Action Officers Group, and MPF Future.

Mr. Bebar was Chairman of NATO Naval Group 6 [NG/6] on Ship Design during the period 1994 – 2002. In this position, he facilitated multi-national dialogue on ship design processes and standards, including use of commercial standards in design and construction and use of Simulation Based Design and Virtual Prototyping for naval ship design and acquisition. His prior assignments have been on various phases of the ship design and acquisition process on the following programs: PHM, AO-177, ARS-50, T-AGOS 23, T-AGS(O), CVX and LHD-5

Mark was Project Naval Architect and Design Integration Manager on the Patrol Hydrofoil – Missile (PHM) ship acquisition program (1971 – 1973 and 1975 – 1978). Responsible for total ship concept and feasibility studies and design integration during Preliminary Design, Contract Design, and Detailed Design & Construction. He was assigned as Deputy Ship Design Manager (DSDM) during PHM follow ship construction and participated in Producibility Studies and Production Readiness Review. He was assigned as the CNO Ship Characteristics and Improvement Panel (SCIP) (OPNAV N863) Senior Staff Naval Architect (1992 – 1994). He participated in staffing of requirements documents (MNS/ORD) for T-ADC(X), SC-21, MCS-12 and MHC(Variant).

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS:

Fellow – Society of Naval Architects & Marine Engineers (SNAME)

Member – American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE)

Vice President – International Hydrofoil Society (IHS)

AWARDS

NAVSEA Lisanby Award for Professionalism (1988)

ASE Professional Achievement Award (1989)

DoN Superior Civilian Service Awards (1994 and 2002)

Mark began his association with hydrofoils at the Naval Ship Engineering Center (NAVSEC) in Hyattsville, Maryland in 1970. He was involved in the Navy’s early concept designs and feasibility studies of what would become a new Navy Fleet Capability, the PHM. Mark worked with the Navy’s hydrofoil advanced development community in what today is called “technology transfer”. He helped analyze and structure the available hydrofoil R&D data to assemble the information that was needed by the Navy’s engineering community to support a follow-on acquisition program. Mark was a part of the Navy team that interfaced with Boeing during the development of PHM’s contract and detail design. This included a series of studies conducted jointly by Boeing and the Navy to correct PHM-1 deficiencies identified during OPEVAL.
Mark has over 38 years of experience, with 27 focused on development design and acquisition support. In his most recent position before retiring from NAVSEA in January 2003 he was Division Director for Future Ship and Force architecture Concepts (SEA 05D1). In this position, he was responsible for conducting whole-ship concept and feasibility studies and supporting assessment of competing ship design alternatives from pre-Milestone A through the Analysis of Alternatives. In January 2003, Mr. Bebar joined CSC’s Advanced Marine Center in the position of Professional Advisor, and assisted in revising the Ship Concept and Feasibility Study Handbook for NAVSEA 05D1. He is currently working on additional tasks for NAVSEA 05D1 related to exploratory ship design and force architecture and also provides support to OPNAV N42 on the High Speed Sealift/Agile Port Action Officer Group and Executive Steering Committee.

Mr. Bebar has received numerous awards, including the NAVSEA Lisanby Award for Professionalism (1988), the ASE Professional achievement Award (1989) and the DoN Superior Civilian Service Award (1994) for his work on the Ship Characteristics and Improvement (SCIP) Staff in OPNAV N86. He received a second Superior Civilian Service Award upon his retirement from NAVSEA and was elected a SNAME Fellow in January 2002.

Billingsley, Joel – Joel became a hydrofoil convert when assigned to the Plainview AGEH-1. As an engineering officer he supervised operation and maintenance of machinery systems on this experimental ship. The Plainview had a checkered history having been designed by Grumman, her construction contract awarded to Puget Sound Bridge & Drydock which was acquired by Lockheed Shipbuilding, and ultimately serviced by Boeing Marine Systems and the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS). During his tour the ship achieved approximately 20 foilborne hours in heavily instrumented trials while attached to the Hydrofoil Special Trials Unit (HYSTU). After these initial trials the ship entered a Post Shakedown Availability (PSA). Following PSA, perhaps in some small part a reflection of his efforts, but even more so the dedicated staff at HYSTU, PSNS and Boeing, the ship achieved over 200 foilborne hours.
After his Navy service, he joined the Naval Ship Engineering Center (NAVSEC) as a mechanical engineer engaged in propulsion system design for high performance ships. There he planned and directed feasibility studies, contract design, analysis and trouble-shooting for patrol craft, hydrofoils, air cushion vehicles, landing craft, minesweepers, and special purpose craft. He led a team to troubleshoot the PHM waterjets and evaluation of her performance. He was heavily involved in the design of a large, frigate-sized hydrofoil with enough fuel capacity to cross the Atlantic. He performed the conceptual design of the world’s largest right angle drive transmission system for this ship, developed a procurement request, contract specification, and conducted contractor selection board. Unfortunately this program was axed perhaps 30 years before its time. During this period he was instrumental in rescuing the Sea Legs, an early experimental Navy hydrofoil, and finding a home for her at the Mariners Museum in Newport News.
He is currently a Senior Project Manager at CSC’s Advanced Marine Center working on new ship acquisition programs including the LHA(R) and the MPF(F).

Dixon, Malin – Mr. Dixon was educated at Shrewsbury School, and Cambridge University, England, where he studied engineering for two years, specializing in Electronics in his third year. After university, he worked for Rugby Cement as an instrumentation engineer. In 1988 Mr. Dixon set up OnSpec Oscillators in partnership with another graduate from Cambridge. OnSpec Oscillators makes crystal oscillators for the electronics industry, and now has an annual turnover of about $700,000. The partner left OnSpec in 1993, and Mr. Dixon has been running it since then. Diving has been his hobby since university, and his interest in hydrofoils has come from the shortcoming of the existing dive boats. Mr. Dixon hopes to construct a small hydrofoil with much better ride and fuel consumption than the present boats. He also has a Trampofoil which he tried to sell in the UK while they were in production, but they were too expensive to reach a mass market. Together with friends, Mr. Dixon has designed and constructed a radio-controlled model hydrofoil with Automatic Control System and fully submerged foil system. Mr. Dixon has been the webmaster for the IHS photo gallery for several years. His goals for IHS include making it easier for overseas members to join the IHS and making more information on hydrofoils available on the website.

Clark, Dennis – Mr. Clark has worked at the Carderock Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center for nearly forty years in a wide variety of positions prior to his retirement in January 2003. He has been Director of Strategic Planning, Assistant Technical Director, Head of the Costing and Design Systems Office, Deputy Head of the Advanced Concepts Office, Manager of Systems Integration in the Advanced Hydrofoil Development Office and lead structural researcher for the Hydrofoil Office. He is a charter member of IHS and throughout his career he has supported the development of advanced vehicles through a number activities such as the development of the Advanced Ship Data Bank (currently containing over 15,000 documents on advanced vehicles). Dennis lead the development of a total ship early stage design tool called ASSET (Advanced Surface Ship Evaluation Tool) for a variety of ship types (surface combatants, hydrofoils, SWATH ships, and tri-hull concepts) and also lead the development of cost estimating capability for advanced technology and vehicles. Dennis has promoted innovation through a number of venues such as Carderock’s Invention Evaluation Board, where, as chairman for the last ten years, he has helped to promote the development of Carderock’s Innovation Center. Dennis is currently ONR’s lead researcher for their Concept Assessment of Platforms and Systems task. Mr. Clark is an engineering graduate of City College of New York and completed some graduate work towards a MBA at George Washington University.
Mr. Clark’s involvement in hydrofoil development started with SEALEGS and ended with the decommissioning of the PHM-1 class

.

Dorey, Peter – IHS President 1974 -1977. Peter Dorey was the Managing Director of Condor Ltd, located on Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands of the United Kingdom. Condor Ltd started in 1964 with one hydrofoil, CONDOR 1, a Rodriquez-built, Supramar designed PT 50. They continued to add Rodriquez hydrofoils to their fleet and became the largest passenger carrier between the Channel Islands and the coast of France. Condor used the Port of St. Malo as their primary destination. However, during March to November, service was provided to the mainland of England. The Society considered it most appropriate to have a hydrofoil operator as president, following the presidency of Baron Hanns von Schertel, a designer and developer of hydrofoils. The Society was quite pleased when Peter Dorey agreed to accept the role of President. Peter was an interesting and likable personality. He was also a conservative manager. Although starting rather early in hydrofoil transportation, he studied and experienced the performance of hydrofoils along with their reliability and maintenance requirements before committing to their acquisition. The first PT 50 was actually assigned to Condor for a trial period prior to making the decision to purchase. Another example of his conservatism was experienced by Grumman. Before the management of Grumman would support the DOLPHIN hydrofoil program, they required that ten potential customers be identified and committed to the program. This commitment was based on the DOLPHIN being produced with the predicted performance and cost. Condor became one of the committed ten. When Peter agreed to this, he said he would take number ten off the production line. His wisdom in wanting to experience the performance, reliability, and cost factors of owning and operating a craft for Condor?s fleet was clearly demonstrated. Peter Dorey became the second President of IHS on January 14, 1974 at the Annual General Meeting in London. In his acceptance remarks to the members, he gave a special vote of thanks to the outgoing president Baron von Schertel, the Chairman of the Council, Mark Thornton, and to Juanita Kalerghi for her support of IHS. President Dorey, in his address, spoke on the status of the hydrofoil industry, stating that it was a growth industry. He further discussed the advantages of the hydrofoil over other vehicles, particularly the open sea passenger comfort.

Gore, Jerry – Mr. Gore’s career began with US Navy enlisted service in naval aviation from 1955-1959. He graduated from Western Maryland College in 1962 and accepted a position at the Navy’s Engineering Experiment Station in submarine silencing. He performed acoustic silencing work on numerous small craft. The Naval Ship Systems Command (now NAVSEASYSCOM) selected Mr. Gore as Technical Manager for the development of a family of four prototype craft, including the Coastal Patrol and Interdiction Craft (CPIC). CPIC’s technology and design has greatly influenced other significant achievements in high performance craft. After service in1973 as the Navy’s first laboratory science advisor in the Operational Test and Evaluation Force (COMOPTEFOR), Mr. Gore subsequently became the “Planing Vehicle Advocate” for the Advanced Naval Vehicles Concepts Evaluation (ANVCE) study. This study realistically compared 6 types of ships and 4 types of aircraft. He served as the staff assistant for vehicle systems in the office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Engineering and Systems (ASN-RES) and has technically managed both the Navy’s Special Warfare Craft Program and the Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) Ship Development Program and was instrumental in producing the Navy’s subsequent SWATH ship construction projects. He has supported NATO’s efforts to evaluate alternative hull forms under Special Working Group-6. In 1984 Mr. Gore was selected for the newly created position as Deputy Director for Ship Programs in the Office of Naval Research’s Low Observables and Counter Low Observables Division in the Special Programs Directorate. He retired in 1997. Mr. Gore now consults with industry and government as Maritime Integrated Ideas. Mr. Gore is a former member of SNAME and AIAA and a current member of ASNE and the IHS.†He completed graduate work in oceanography and acoustics as well as programs at the Federal Executive Institute, as well as specialized programs in the field of low observable signatures. His commendations and awards include both the Navy’s Superior Civilian Service and Meritorious Civilian Service Awards. As a member of the Board, Jerry Gore’s experience in other types of hull forms (planing hulls, SWATH, catamarans and lift augmentation) gives him a perspective that is unusual, and that both contrasts and compliments the hydrofoil specialist. He will aid the organization in keeping a broader focus toward less specialized future hydrofoil applications and lower cost solutions.

HARRY LARSEN – Background: I graduated from the University of Washington with a BA in mathematics. My 35 year career at The Boeing Company was largely in building and operating economic simulators of programs and projects. Most of them produced both first and second moment forecasts. In the later years, with the advances in computing, they were typically Monte Carlo systems. My interest in hydrofoils was spurred by Kalman Filter’s duality of control and estimation. A hydrofoil hobby, while fostering my mathematical background, also fit well with the family’s boat building facilities. During my 10 years in Boeing Marine Systems (BMS) I built and operated the system that produced the quarterly Financial Project Cost Reports (financial forecasts) for the Jetfoil program. Later I modeled and operated the the division’s overhead forecasting system. During the last few years of BMS I served as its Business Planning Manager. I have several published papers, one on bidding, in the Journal of Missiles and Space (No. 1 1996) of the PRC.

Goal: Over the last decade there has been a blossoming of small project/amateur hydrofoil activity. We have seen the Moth class, the Trifoiler and Rave, many human powered craft, the work of Horiuchi and Sahlin, my own boat and now others like it, and many many others. Judging from the web, the pace seems to be quickening. This year, the America’s Cup winner will be, effectively, a hydrofoil! This has taken place largely outside of the Navy/marine engineering community. The IHS plays a critical role as the source for hydrofoil technology, particularly for the amateur hydrofoiler, but its role as the cross roads for hydrofoil activity world wide should be strengthened.

MARTIN GRIMM: Mr. Grimm has been employed as a naval architect within the Department of Defence in Australia since graduating from the University of New South Wales in 1990. He has predominantly been engaged in hydrodynamics analysis and design reviews, though never related to hydrofoil craft. During leave from the Department in 2003, he was employed by Seastate Pty Ltd, a ship motion control system design and manufacturing company, where he was engaged in consultancy work assessing the benefits of installation of motion control systems on a range of high speed vessel types. He was also involved in initial design of the motion control system for the Austal 127m trimaran, Benchijigua Express. His interest in hydrofoils dates back to a family visit to Sydney at an early age where he marveled at the sleek and modern surface piercing hydrofoils then operating on Sydney Harbour. That interest motivated him to complete a thesis project examining the motions in waves of surface piercing hydrofoils. He joined the IHS in 1994 to become acquainted with others involved in this niche field and since then has gained numerous contacts and friend through IHS. Martin is married with two young children and is also the owner of a Russian Volga 70 sports hydrofoil which awaits family use. IHS GOALS: One of the objectives of the IHS is to stimulate and promote interest in all hydrofoil applications. Since the IHS website discussion forum was initiated, I have responded to enquiries where possible and in more recent years, I have also contributed hydrofoil sailing material for the IHS Newsletter. I intend to continue such involvement. Following the sad loss in 2009 of Ken Spaulding, a long term IHS Board Member and Secretary, I was invited to join the Board for the remainder of Ken’s term. As he had done, I intend to promote opportunities where IHS could support hydrofoil preservation initiatives around the world. I am also keen to promote the benefits of hydrofoil technology to the new generation of naval architects and marine engineers. Finally, I welcome the opportunity to provide representation from outside the USA on the Board of our international society.

Hockberger, William – Bill is an independent consultant in systems engineering, economic analysis and ship design. He worked for 27 years as a naval architect and design manager in the US Navy’s ship design organization, on all types of naval ships. In his final Navy position he headed the Advanced Design and Assessment Branch, with responsibility for technology and design of advanced marine vehicles and for economic and cost-effectiveness analysis of naval ships in general.
In recent years he has worked primarily on commercial ships and systems, a major focus being business planning of fast ferry services and marine highways (“short sea shipping”) projects. He continues to do ship/craft design and technical work as well. Besides consulting he is also involved in three small start-up companies aiming to introduce new high-speed marine vehicles into service.
Bill holds degrees in naval architecture and marine engineering (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), operations research (MIT) and applied economics (American University). He has been an IHS member for many years and on its Board of Directors since 1994. He is a Fellow of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Chairman of its Panel SD-5 (Advanced Surface Ships and Craft) and a member of Panel O-36 (Maritime Economics). He is also a member of the American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), and is an affiliate of the Transportation Research Board and a member of its Committee on Ferry Transportation.

Through his work and his involvement in SNAME Panel SD-5, Bill maintains a broad awareness of new and potential opportunities for application of hydrofoils and other advanced marine vehicles, and has helped keep the IHS Board apprised of them. He has also been effective in fostering joint activities of IHS with other professional marine organizations.

Horn, Capt. Frank G. (Ret) -Captain Frank Horn’s afloat billets included Engineering Officer, USS Hunting (EAG-398); Operations Officer, USS McNair (DD-679); Operations Officer, USS Richard E. Byrd, (DDG-23); Electronics Warfare Officer, Commander Destroyer Flotilla 12; Commanding Officer, USS Calcaterra (DER-390) and USS Richard E. Byrd (DDG-32) and Commanding Officer of the destroyer tender USS Yosemite (AD-19) . His assignments ashore included two tours in the in the Bureau of Naval Personnel; and two tours in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, with responsibility for systems and ship acquisition.
In the early 1980’s, he served as Commander Patrol Combat Missile Hydrofoil Squadron TWO (COMPHMRON TWO) homeported in Key West, Florida.. During this period he was responsible for the day-to-day maintenance and operations of the US Navy’s first and only full-scale operational hydrofoil group, as well as for its long range operational and support planning. Among other achievements, he negotiated and implemented a Memorandum of Understanding with the U S Coast Guard; a complex document governing the use of these ships in law enforcement operations.

Jenkins, George – – George is a U.S. Naval Academy graduate, Class of 1958. As a Surface Warfare Officer, his sea tours included Destroyers, Destroyer staffs and Mobile Logistic Support Force (MLSF) (Command). His shore tours included the U.S. Naval Academy (instructor in Physics 1967-1969), U.S. Naval War College as a student in 1970, Defense Nuclear Agency (1972-1974), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) serving as PHM Program coordinator from 1976 through 1979. He also served on the staff of the Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe for the detailed planning for PHM support in the Mediterranean. He retired from the Navy in 1981. From November 1982 until October 1993 George provided technical and management support to the OPNAV PHM Platform Sponsor. After providing support to seven NAVAIR and NAVSEA Combat System acquisitions, he retired in 2000. He resides in Alexandria Virginia.
George served as Treasurer of the IHS from 1996 to 2009 and will continue to work with the new IHS Treasurer, Frank Horn. George was recently awarded a Meritorious Life Membership in the IHS in recognition of his long and devoted service as IHS Treasurer.

.

King, Jim – James H. King is a naval architect and has been active in the field for over 27 years. He was engaged in the U.S. Navy’s Advanced Hydrofoil Program in the 1970s and 1980s. He designed NATO’s oceanographic ship R/V ALLIANCE during the early 1980s. He has been engaged in various technology efforts for the U.S. Navy since then. He has been a member of IHS since 1980. As a member of the IHS Board, Jim King will continue to emphasize the significance of and issues important to members remote from the Washington DC area. He has sought to improve connectivity among members. He plans to emphasize the technology aspect of the IHS mission.

Liang, David – IHS President 1981 – 1985. In March 1981, an IHS general meeting was held at the Royal Institute of Naval Architect in London. At this meeting, the selection of David Liang as President was announced. His selection was in keeping with having a sequence of an operator and a developer of hydrofoils alternate as president. David?s father had established the Hong Kong Macao Hydrofoil Company in 1964. When his father died in 1977, David became responsible for managing his family?s interests. These interests included not only the hydrofoil company but also an old established shipping and ferry company, hotels, other real estate holdings, as well as interests in other small businesses in Hong Kong. In this regard, he was the ?Tai-Pan? of the Liang family assisted by his brothers. The China interest in the link between Macao and Hong Kong placed particular importance on the hydrofoil company. David Liang?s aims for the IHS included broadening the membership to encompass a wider cross section of people including mariners, designers, shipbuilders, and transportation consultants. During David Liang?s term as president of the Society, changes took place within IHS and the expanding world of hydrofoils. In competition with the Hong Kong Macao Hydrofoil Company, the Far East Company of Hong Kong acquired Boeing-built Jetfoils. This competition along with the demands of the Liang family?s businesses curtailed David?s travels to various meeting of the Council in London and the North American Chapter. David stayed in touch with both organizations and suggested an IHS meeting in Hong Kong. This never came to be, much to the regret of many of the membership.
Leigh, McCue-Weil

Leigh is an Associate Professor in Virginia Tech’s Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, an affiliate to the VT Department of Engineering Education, and a core faculty member of the Virginia Center for Autonomous Systems. Her research interests are in nonlinear and chaotic vessel dynamics and she teaches courses in naval architecture, ship dynamics, dynamics of high-speed craft, and the history of women in aerospace and ocean engineering. Dr. McCue has twice participated in the ASEE-ONR Summer Faculty Research Program to pursue her research in collaboration with researchers at the Carderock Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center and is currently on sabbatical for the 2011-2012 academic year with the Combatant Craft Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock. Dr. McCue received her BSE degree in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in 2000 from Princeton University. She earned her graduate degrees from the University of Michigan in Aerospace Engineering (MSE 2001) and Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering (MSE 2002, PhD 2004). At the 2007 Virginia Tech College of Engineering Dean’s Awards she received an ‘Outstanding New Assistant Professor’ award; at the 2010 Dean’s Awards she was named a ‘Faculty Fellow’. In 2008 Dr. McCue received both an NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) grant and an ONR Young Investigator Program (YIP) grant. McCue is the recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

Goals:
If elected to the IHS Board of Directors I will aim to further the connections between IHS and academia. In my teaching experiences, I have observed the very sincere passion students exhibit for technical problems related to high speed craft. I would like to channel that enthusiasm to enhance participation by students and young professionals in the IHS helping to further recruitment of the next generation of naval engineers with particular emphasis on the novel challenges and opportunities hydrofoils present. Additionally, as I am currently serving on ASNE’s Council, I would like to contribute to the existing positive relationship currently shared between these two societies.

Meyer, John R. – – (Deceased) Mr. Meyer holds Bachelors and Masters degrees in Aero-nautical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and has done additional graduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the same field. Since joining the David Taylor Naval Ship R&D Center in 1971, he has been associated with Advanced Naval Vehicles, particularly hydrofoils and hybrid ship forms, in the Advanced Concepts Office and the Programs Department of the Ship Systems and Programs Directorate. He has authored a number of DTRC reports, AIAA, and ASNE papers on the subject of hydrofoils and hybrid marine vehicles. He holds several patents in this technical area. Prior to employment at DTRC he held several research and development, long range planning, and engineering management positions with Boeing-Vertol, Trans-Sonics Inc., Air Force Cambridge Research Center, and the Aero-Elastic Laboratory at M.I.T. Retired since 1997, he serves as consultant on hydrofoil, hybrid hullform, and other high performance marine vehicles. He has served on the AIAA Marine Systems and Technologies Committee, the High Speed Vehicle Committee of the American Towing Tank Conference, and now as President of the International Hydrofoil Society. He is also a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Society of Sigma Xi.

Monk, John — John Monk began his hydrofoil career at The Boeing Company in August of 1959. He went to Boeing with plans to work on missiles, airplanes, etc. However, his supervisor told him he was being assigned to Harbor Island to work on ships that flew on wings. He never dreamed he would work on ships. The first hydrofoil he worked on was not a hydrofoil it was a high speed hydroplane, Hydrofoil Test System (HTS). It was powered by a jet engine, and designed to test model hydrofoils suspended between the twin hulls. His first ship was the HIGH POINT (PCH-I and Mod-1); Next was TUCUMUARI (PGH-2); then the largest hydrofoil of all the PLAINVIEW (AGEH-1) and subsequently “Little Squirt”, the first water jet hydrofoil. Then after a short time on the 747 and the SES programs, John left Boeing to come to Washington DC to join Wheeler Industries Inc. There he provided support to the US Navy hydrofoil programs at the David Taylor Naval Research and Development Center, NAVSEA, NAVSEC and OPNAV. Eventually he spent the last eighteen years of his hydrofoil career supporting the PHM Program in Washington and Key West Florida. He graduated from the University of Montana and is a charter member of the International Hydrofoil Society.

David A. Patch — U.S. Navy “ship driver,” engineer and 25-year career Naval officer…New ship technology coordinator on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations…20 years as a management executive and consultant for technology companies large and small, with business relationships worldwide…Successful entrepreneur who has helped launch seven start-up companies based on patented or innovative technologies…Creator of the State of Maine’s Small Business Innovation Research Assistance Program and longtime advocate of taxpayer investment in American ingenuity…Consultant to the National Science Foundation…Lifelong sailor, outdoor enthusiast and former marathoner.

In 2007, CDR Patch became President of RSL Fiber Systems, a new company providing high tech fiber optic delivered lighting systems to the Navy. Retiring in 2010, he is on the Board of Directors and serves as a senior advisor to the company and remains instrumental as a strategist for new business development, marketing and defense industry technology applications, contracts and research grants.

In retirement, Dave volunteers with Maine Adaptive Sports & Recreation as a kayak, bike, and skiing instructor to those with disabilities, including our wounded warriors. Dave serves on the boards of several non-profit organizations that serve our veterans.

ROBERTS, JOEL H. – Mr. Roberts graduated from Purdue University in 1965 as a Navy Ensign with a degree in electrical engineering. After two shipboard assignments as chief engineer, he was assigned as Officer in Charge of High Point (PCH-1). High Point completely captivated Mr. Roberts, and provided him the good fortune to continue his passion at NSRDC Carderock followed by Pegasus (PHM-1) as Executive Officer. Non-hydrofoil duties included Operations Officer on USS Texas (CGN-39). NROTC Executive Officer at Prairie View A&M University, and acquisition related duty at the Naval Material Command and the Naval Sea Systems Command. Along the way, Mr. Roberts enjoyed expanding his horizons at the Naval Destroyer School, the Naval War College, the DOD Comptroller School, and Prairie View A&M University where he earned an MBA. Mr. Roberts retired from the Navy in 1988. Since that time he has been employed as a defense contractor with companies under contract to Navy Ship Acquisition Programs, primarily the Arleigh Burke class destroyer program.
Mr. Roberts is currently employed by BAE Systems as an Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Systems Integration Engineer. He applies this technology to Earned Value Management of shipbuilding contract performance reporting.

Spaulding, Ken – Ken Spaulding has 41 years of ship/AMV design and R&D experience, including 8 years as Technical Director of NAVSEA CONFORM Program; 12 years boat design; two years Deputy Design Manager FFG-7; 1 year management of submarine R&D; 5 years management of foreign AMV FMS and DEAs including NATO SWG/6; 5 years management of AALC/LCAC and hydrofoil designs. two years of technology studies. He served as 1993/94 Chairman of SNAME SD-5 Panel on Advanced Marine Vehicles. Ken is currently a member of USHS and IHS Boards. He has authored numerous fiberglass construction and AMV publications. Ken Spaulding has a major interest in the expansion of IHS membership with emphasis on Universities with AMV related programs since it is important to introduce new generations of designers to the potential of hydrofoils. He favors continuance of AMV CD-ROM initiative, funding and international support, encouragement of TV hydrofoil exposure, and a possible traveling hydrofoil museum exhibit. He intends to provide maximum support of the current outstanding website and newsletter efforts of Barney Black and John Meyer.

RAY VELLINGA — Mr. Vellinga is a former Naval Reserve officer. In Aviation Officer Candidate’s school, he was first in overall achievement and received honors in academics and athletics. Following AOC Ray received flight training and course work in aerodynamics. Later, as a staff officer on COMFAIRSD and FASTFAC he supervised a division of men responsible for offshore air surveillance. He holds a FAA commercial instrument-rated pilot’s license, and is a graduate of Bradley University. Commercial and Industrial Building Real Estate Development has been his primary occupation.  Presently, Ray is one of two primary owners of the Gig Harbor Marina and Boat Yard.  https://gigharbormarina.com/  The GHMBY is a Sustaining Member of IHS.

Ray is the designer and builder of hydrofoil boats, including personal hydrofoils: SabreFoil, Hifybe, and Speedy Gonzo. He created the business, Univista Co. to build and market Sabrefoil.

The informal San Diego Human Powered Hydrofoil Group was founded by Ray and five California hydrofoil enthusiasts. As an active member, he has contributed advice and counsel in the design of perhaps 15 human powered hydrofoils designed and built by Dwight Filley (IHS) and Steve Ball. One of the early associates, Terry Hendrics, PhD., received a patent on his hydrofoil kneeboard. As a friend of Harry Larsen (IHS), Ray has had the good fortune to enjoy many flights aboard Harry’s hydrodynamically and electronically sophisticated hydrofoil, Talaria IV.

Ray Vellinga is the author of the book, Hydrofoils: Design, Build, Fly. He is the editor-producer of 22 YouTube hydrofoil videos (viewed 4,400,000 times as of April, 2012). Patricia, Ray’s wife, has written and published a non-fiction book, Sailing there, Cruising Across Europe and the Mediterranean, their story of two decades of sailing the Mediterranean.

Ray is a contributor to the IHS Newsletter.

Acting as point person, Ray initiated an attempt to relocate the Boeing FRESH-1 hydrofoil to the Tacoma Foss Waterway Seaport. From a generous anonymous donor, Ray received a pledge of $25,000 for the boat’s renovation. Presently he is attempting to relocate Boeing’s hydrofoil prototype Little Squirt to the Tacoma Foss Waterway Seaport. The project has received permission from the Museum to continue the effort.

Presently, Ray is initiating the involvement of the IHS in the Maritime Fest of the Tacoma Foss Waterway Seaport. The event will feature static displays, demonstration flights, and IHS member participation in the August 25-26, 2012 event.

W. SCOTT WEIDLE – Scott has a B.S. in Ocean Engineering at Virginia Tech with studies in ship design and advanced marine vehicles under the tutelage of Dr. McCue. Since 2011, Scott has worked at NSWC Carderock at the Center for Innovation in Ship Design (CISD). At CISD, Scott has undertaken several concept ship design projects, performed ship integration studies and has worked for the DDG 1000 SDM on rotation. In addition, Scott is taking distance learning courses part-time through Virginia Tech working towards a M.S. in Ocean Engineering.
IHS Goals: To me, the primary goal of IHS is to stimulate interest in hydrofoils and advanced marine vehicles so that the concepts and ideas do not die with their creators but live on through the next generation of naval architects and engineers. Upon election to the board, I will continue and step my promotion of IHS by seeking out young engineers.

WILLIAM WHITE — Mr. White has 50 years experience with Naval and Commercial ship design, technology development and information technology utilization, including computer databases, network design, software system implementation, programming and maintenance.

The early part of his career was in the Naval Shipyards working on the designs of nuclear attack and ballistic missile submarines and deep submersibles. In the early 70s, at the David Taylor Model Basin, Bill White created computer seakeeping and maneuvering simulations for the PHMs, AALC JEFF A&B, SES 100 A&B and 3K SES. He helped improve the PHMs propulsion systems, especially the waterjet pumps and inlets. He then joined the Navy’s Surface Effect Ship Project and managed the three thousand-ton Surface Effect Ship (3K-SES) 250,000hp Machinery Plant advanced technology development. In 1980 he began overseeing NAVSEA’s SES and ACV research and development programs as he held more senior management positions within the Naval Sea Systems Command. He served as the US Delegate to NATO’s Special Working Group Six on Advanced Naval Vehicles developing SWATH, SES, ACV’S, Hydrofoils etc. He was also active in many ship acquisition programs; contributed to the Seawolf, DDG 51, the MCM and MHCs, the LPD17, the US Coast Guards fleet of SES, and many other programs.

At the Naval Sea Systems Command from 1987 onward, his focus was in the areas of advanced ships and the execution of the R&D programs required for their construction and operation. As Director of NAVSEA’s Corp. R&D Division in the 90’s he was responsible for the Command’s SBIR, ACTD, ATD, LEAD, DUAP, IR&D and 6.2-6.3 and all other general R&D programs.

Currently, Mr. White is president of Searider Inc. He has been providing Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) R&D management and technology automation support for NAVSEA Acquisition Programs. This has included, LANs, computer hardware, software and computer databases development, military hardware installation, operation, maintenance and management. He has also led Searider Inc. in the design of high performance ships, pleasure craft, high-speed ferries, fishing vessels, and the development of propulsion systems and computerized design and program management tools.

IHS GOALS: For the International Hydrofoil Society (IHS), Mr. White has been volunteering his time to maintain the “IHS Web Site and Bulletin Boards”. It has been a rewarding experience as he has gotten to know and appreciate the worldwide breadth and diversity of the personal and professional interest in hydrofoils and other advanced marine vehicles. He is interested in continuing to support all the activities of the society to grow and become even more member interactive and supportive.