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Last post to board: Thu 31 Aug 2017 06:52 PM
International Hydrofoil Society (IHS) Hydrofoil Message: Chats, Info Sharing, Networking
General: IHS Administration (41 msgs – LastMsg:12-30-16 )
Help on Sydney Hydrofoil plans – (Steven Evans) 12-04-16
Help on Sydney Hydrofoil plans – (Steven Evans) 12-04-16 – 1:46 AM

Hi everyone.
My name is Steve Evans
and I have spent the last few years trying to track down some plans of the old Sydney Hydrofoils the PT50, RHS-140 and the RHS-160F
As i am wanting to try and scratch build these in model form.
I was wondering if anybody can help.
I have tried the Rodriguez ship building Company But got no response and even tried the Sydney Maritime and SHF Maritime museum but with no luck.
If you can help my email address is sgbevans@bigpond.com
Thanks
Steve Evans

Date=12-04-16 Name:Steven Evans [Msgid=2598978] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
Help on Sydney Hydrofoil plans (Steven Evans) 12-04-16
Reply to request for help (RAY VELLINGA) 12-30-16

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Reply to request for help – (RAY VELLINGA) 12-30-16 – 7:29 PM

Hi Steve,
Sorry I cannot help with your specific request for plans, but I may be able to help you in general by making you a member of the International Hydrofoil Society for free. For decades it has cost $30 per year. There is no obligation and I will send you our newsletter in a few weeks when it becomes available.

Ray Velllinga
IHSPRESIDENT2016@GMAIL.COM

Date=12-30-16 Name:RAY VELLINGA [Msgid=2606635] ModifyMsg

Ray Vellinga

Reply to request for help – (RAY VELLINGA) 12-30-16
Simon Tang, Scalespeed Disappearance – (Kent Van Allen) 09-17-16

General: IHS Administration
Simon Tang, Scalespeed Disappearance 09-17-16

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Simon Tang, Scalespeed Disappearance – (Kent Van Allen) 09-17-16 – 11:21 PM

Hello All,
I ordered a custom made boat from Simon Tang at Scalespeed (made in China).
After 1/2 downpayment of cost ($1,000+) and after two years without delivery of the boat, He no longer responds to emails and the Scalespeed website has disappeared.
He was a noted member of your organization a few years ago.
Does anyone have any information on his integrity or what happened to him and his website?
Thank you
KR

Date=09-17-16 Name:Kent Van Allen [Msgid=2575126] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
Simon Tang, Scalespeed Disappearance (Kent Van Allen) 09-17-16
We have no record of him. (RAY VELLINGA) 09-25-16

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We have no record of him. – (RAY VELLINGA) 09-25-16 – 9:18 PM

Dear KR,

It is sad to hear your experience. If we could help you contact Simon Tang, we would, however I have never heard of the gentleman and after reviewing our June 2016 membership list, it appears we have no record of him.

Did he represent himself as a member of the International Hydrofoil Society? Of course, even if he was a member, we do not guarantee an individual’s performance.

I do see that there is a web site for http://www.scalespeed.co.uk/ May I assume you have contacted them?

Good luck, we all hope you find a satisfactory solution.

Ray Vellinga
IHSpresident2016@gmail.com

Date=09-25-16 Name:RAY VELLINGA [Msgid=2577451] ModifyMsg

Ray Vellinga

We have no record of him. – (RAY VELLINGA) 09-25-16
UK TV show – Archive footage request – (Nina Kitajewski) 07-21-16

General: IHS Administration
UK TV show – Archive footage request 07-21-16

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UK TV show – Archive footage request – (Nina Kitajewski) 07-21-16 – 9:32 AM

Hi,

I am hoping you may be able to send me the contact details for who is best to speak to about requesting permissions. We would like to use some footage and a still from your gallery. The programme is in edit at the moment so would really appreciate if you may be able to reply soon.

Many Thanks
Nina

+44(0)121 697 1916
nina.kitajewski@northonetv.com

Date=07-21-16 Name:Nina Kitajewski [Msgid=2556322] ModifyMsg

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Multi-Agency Craft Conf (MACC) Jun8-9 – (Bill) 05-20-16
3 Feb; IHS/SD-5 Dinner Mtg. – (White) 01-12-16

General: IHS Administration
Multi-Agency Craft Conf (MACC) Jun8-9 05-20-16

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Multi-Agency Craft Conf (MACC) Jun8-9 – (Bill) 05-20-16 – 8:06 PM

Multi-Agency Craft Conference (MACC)

June 8-9, 2016 United States Coast Guard Yard, Baltimore, MD

The Multi-Agency Craft Conference (MACC) is an open forum for the exchange of operational and technical information on small boats and craft between Government agencies and the maritime community. The American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) is proud to announce that MACC 2016 will be held at the United States Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore, MD. The USCG venue allows us to broaden the community reach of those looking to acquire small craft and high speed boats. As with previous MACCs, the exhibit tent will feature 100+ booths, live in-water boat demos, static displays, technical sessions, and high-level keynotes and panel presentations. We are extremely excited since this venue not only allows us the opportunity to incorporate panel & technical session rooms within the exhibit tent, but also provides ample outdoor pavilion space for the evening’s networking Coastal Social and close walking proximity to the in-water boat demos.

Since its founding in 1998, MACC has served as a primary venue for leveraging knowledge and lessons-learned across multiple Government agencies that develop, procure, or operate small boats and craft. Previous conferences have covered a broad range of topics including: requirements generation, boat and craft design, acquisition processes, maintenance and repair practices, logistics and training, and new technology development and integration. The shared information results in effective use of resources, opportunities for collaboration, a more knowledgeable industry-base, and best-value small boats and craft for all end-user communities.
MACC is BACK…

REGISTER TODAY
http://www.navalengineers.org/Symposia/MACC-2016
Use code MACC-IHS to receive 10% off standard non-member ASNE rates.

Date=05-20-16 Name:Bill [Msgid=2536043] ModifyMsg

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If you must cut them yourself – (Scott Smith) 12-31-15

General: IHS Administration
Multi-Agency Craft Conf (MACC) Jun8-9 05-20-16

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Multi-Agency Craft Conf (MACC) Jun8-9 – (Bill) 05-20-16 – 8:06 PM

Multi-Agency Craft Conference (MACC)

June 8-9, 2016 United States Coast Guard Yard, Baltimore, MD

The Multi-Agency Craft Conference (MACC) is an open forum for the exchange of operational and technical information on small boats and craft between Government agencies and the maritime community. The American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) is proud to announce that MACC 2016 will be held at the United States Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore, MD. The USCG venue allows us to broaden the community reach of those looking to acquire small craft and high speed boats. As with previous MACCs, the exhibit tent will feature 100+ booths, live in-water boat demos, static displays, technical sessions, and high-level keynotes and panel presentations. We are extremely excited since this venue not only allows us the opportunity to incorporate panel & technical session rooms within the exhibit tent, but also provides ample outdoor pavilion space for the evening’s networking Coastal Social and close walking proximity to the in-water boat demos.

Since its founding in 1998, MACC has served as a primary venue for leveraging knowledge and lessons-learned across multiple Government agencies that develop, procure, or operate small boats and craft. Previous conferences have covered a broad range of topics including: requirements generation, boat and craft design, acquisition processes, maintenance and repair practices, logistics and training, and new technology development and integration. The shared information results in effective use of resources, opportunities for collaboration, a more knowledgeable industry-base, and best-value small boats and craft for all end-user communities.
MACC is BACK…

REGISTER TODAY
http://www.navalengineers.org/Symposia/MACC-2016
Use code MACC-IHS to receive 10% off standard non-member ASNE rates.

Date=05-20-16 Name:Bill [Msgid=2536043] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
3 Feb; IHS/SD-5 Dinner Mtg. 01-12-16

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3 Feb; IHS/SD-5 Dinner Mtg. – (White) 01-12-16 – 6:40 PM

Next 3 February 2016: JOINT DINNER MEETING of SNAME SD-5 PANEL AND INTERNATIONAL HYDROFOIL SOCIETY Topic: “The Quadrimaran”: Four identical wedge-shaped planing hulls William Hockberger: Chair of SNAME SD-5 & a Naval Architect and Independent Consultant Wednesday, 3 February 2016 At the Army Navy Country Club, Arlington, VA From 5:30 to 6:30 Cash Bar – 6:30 to 7:30 Dinner – 7:30 to 8:30 Program Romaine salad Grilled marinated chicken paillard with saffron cous cous and broccolini Deep dish apple pie, Coffee & tea Price: $35.00 To pay online, 29 January, go to www.foils.org/meetings.htm Make reservations by 4:00 Friday, 29 January with Allen Ford at allenford@verizon.net or Joel Billingsley at Joel.Billingsley@csra.com Please honor reservations. No-shows may be requested to cover costs incurred. (Download Announcement here) Topic: “The Quadrimaran”: Four identical wedge-shaped planing hulls William Hockberger: Chair of SNAME SD-5 & a Naval Architect and Independent Consultant The Quadrimaran has four identical wedge-shaped planing hulls that are flat on the bottom and sloped downward toward the stern. It was designed to operate at 45-60 knots but with relatively lower drag than other high-speed ships, yielding power and fuel savings to compensate for the increases in structure and outfit from having four hulls. A 57-foot prototype impressed prospective investors and buyers, and several major European companies supported further development and designs, with the major classification societies involved. An 85-foot passenger ferry was built for Caribbean operation, and numerous other designs were done, but contractual and financial problems stopped further construction. The concept gained a degree of acceptance in the US for possible high-speed sealift application, but recent analysis has shown that the problems experienced were due to fundamental technical reasons, which will be discussed and explained. The French inventor has reenergized his promotion of the Quadrimaran, so it is again a timely subject. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ William Hockberger is a naval architect and independent consultant in marine systems planning, design and development. Following 27 years in the US Navy’s ship design organization, he now works mainly on commercial marine systems, especially ferries and intermodal freight. He has a particular interest in high-performance ship design and chairs SNAME’s SD-5 Panel on Advanced Ships and Craft. Bill holds a bachelor’s degree in naval architecture and marine engineering (MIT), master’s degrees in operations research (MIT) and applied economics (American University), and is a Registered Professional Engineer. Besides SNAME he is a member of IHS and ASNE and an affiliate of the Transportation Research Board and active on its Committee on Ferry Transportation and Committee on the Logistics of Disaster Response and Business Continuity. ___________________________________________________________________________________
Date=01-12-16 Name:White [Msgid=2492447] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
If you must cut them yourself 12-31-15

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If you must cut them yourself – (Scott Smith) 12-31-15 – 8:29 AM

Pour casting aluminum struts will require you to use a good flux to get rid of the aluminum oxides and porosity. I’m sure you can find lots of info on that on the internet. Any factory made solid bar will have much better properties, and to get enough stiffness the type of aluminum and heat treatment is very important. Most of what you will find at the scrapyard will be 6061 or some variant. Cast it yourself and it is likely to be either soft, or full of inclusions or voids. The Popular Science plans show how to make Eppler foils from wood using only a table saw. You would have to be careful, but a similar technique could be used to make aluminum foils from a piece of plate. Aluminum will cut with woodworking tools, the table saw cutting speed is a little high but if you use cutting oil and are careful you should be able to worry through some sections.

I am all for using steel. If you have any brazing or welding experience all the better. Someone is bound to ask, “brazing?”. Yes, welding would be better but if you have a decent torch and reasonable technique brazing is easy. Welding would be stronger but brazing is good enough to hold bicycle frames together. My suggestion would be to find a large diameter thin walled pipe (think 55 gallon drum) to cut the top of the foil from, or start with a piece of steel sheet and have a local metal working company roll it to the needed radius. I made some custom tapered barrels for our casting operation once, having someone put a piece of sheet through a slip-roll is cheaper than you might think. That would be the upper surface of the Eppler. Weld/Braze a flat bottom to it and you are almost there.

Wood, aluminum, steel, fiberglass, aluminum bronze, carbon fiber, metal matrix composite, Nitinol, sintered tungsten carbide, etc. etc. Materials run all up and down the scales for hardness, stiffness, weight, formability, weldability, machinability, corrosion resistance, cost, availability, etc. Use what you can get cheap, work with the tools you have access to, and something that doesn’t take too much time to get into shape. I’ve seen working foils made from plywood. I wouldn’t necessarily recommend that, but if it works and is easy to make, then start there first. If the foils work, then great. If they don’t then you haven’t wasted a lot of time and money, and you’ll have a much better idea of what material you will really need. In my experience there is no surer way to fail than to take on a project that I have never done before, using time consuming untested techniques, on difficult to work material, to try to produce a finished design ready for use. Prototype first from whatever is available, learn important unforeseen lessons, then go on to the 2nd, 3rd, or 10th iteration, if you think you’ve got it all figured out, then start your final design.

Date=12-31-15 Name:Scott Smith [Msgid=2488921] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
Watched Worlds Fastest Indian? 12-12-15

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Watched Worlds Fastest Indian? – (Scott Smith) 12-12-15 – 10:24 AM

Yes, you can absolutely cast your own struts. I did quite a bit of casting with aluminum bronze, stainless steel super-alloy, and some casting with aluminum. It is an endeavor though. There are a few methods you could use (for something as large as a strut).

General considerations: You will need a thermocouple temperature sensor (IR won’t work without special calibration). You will need twice as much aluminum for the pour, much will remain in the sprue to help mitigate how much the aluminum shrinks as it cools. Even if you get the gating, sprues, investing, burnout, raw material, pour temperature, etc. correct, you will still have issues. Voids, inclusions, deformation from shrinkage, porosity, etc. Without knowing the exact composition of the parts you are melting down you will have no control over the properties of the aluminum in the finished part. And this is just a simple overview.

Lost wax method: I did a LOT of this (over a million parts per year). It requires a lot of investment (plaster mold material), a big container to put it in, an even bigger oven to do the burn out. You will need a large crucible to melt all that aluminum, and pouring it will be DANGEROUS if you aren’t experienced. Improperly done molds can literally explode, flinging molten metal everywhere. We cast into flasks that were 4″ in diameter and 6″ long. We wore aluminized coats, gloves, and head coverings. Closed shoes, and special glasses to filter out the infrared. Between melting the aluminum, opening the furnace door to retrieve the mold, and performing the casting itself there is enough IR to damage your eyes. You can’t see IR, and once damaged your eyes are unlikely to recover. Shrinkage on a part that big will be very difficult to control. The amount of investment needed per part would be expensive, and you need a disposable pattern for every casting attempt. This type of casting works well for small parts (we used it to make the cutting ends of surgical devices) and can be VERY accurate. We used injection molded plastic patterns, if you wrote on the pattern with a pencil, you could read it after casting. It is the method used by most jewelers, but don’t forget that they don’t care about accuracy because they will hand polish afterward. It just isn’t practical for what you want. It is fun to do and can be done simply at home if you want to make really small parts, like jewelry.

Shell casting: The pattern is attached to a sprue. It is then dipped into a vat of liquid investment, then showered with investment powder. This forms a thin shell. The process is repeated over and over again, using different grades of investment to maintain shell porosity. Eventually the whole thing is put in a furnace and the pattern is burned out. The shell hardens into a ceramic mold. Again, uses a lot of investment, but not as much as the lost wax method. Time consuming. Same casting problems as mentioned before. A lot of things are shell-cast, but usually only as a rough casting to be machined later.

Sand Casting: A pattern is pressed into a box full of a special kind of sand, and then the pattern is removed. Two sided molds can be made this way also. The sand is typically cheaper than investment, and doesn’t need to be fired in a big furnace. Good detail can be produced if done properly. The pattern is reusable. This is better for your application than the lost wax method, but still takes knowledge, practice, and a good set-up. And there will still be issues with the final part.

Die casting is way too expensive for one-off parts, so I won’t go into it. Like a lot of things, the idea of casting your own aluminum struts sounds fairly simple and cheap, but it just isn’t. You WILL spend lots of time and money, and risk injury, to produce low quality parts.

Alternatives…

Sand casting: Yes, okay, sand casting. But don’t do it yourself. Find a shop (use the Thomas Register online) that makes cast aluminum furniture, or does small runs. Show them a preliminary drawing and let them help you to figure out the pattern and sprue. Unless you are good at it, let a CNC machine shop, or a sign shop with a router table cut your pattern, probably from wood. I wouldn’t do this unless you are sure your design won’t change, and you plan on making several parts.

Machining: Metal scrap yards don’t just buy aluminum, most will sell it back to you cheap. Large billets of aluminum aren’t common, but are sometimes available. Buy a piece of aluminum wherever you can, and have a machine shop CNC it to shape. Even at a few hundred dollars it’s probably cheaper than anything else you can do, and it will be accurate with no internal issues in the aluminum.

Forming: Buy some sheet aluminum and have it bent and welded to shape. That is how some of the rear struts on the Dynafoil were made. You might even be able to do it yourself. Design your strut based on this process, and you might be able to do it cheap. For example, since this is a strut, a simple symmetrical profile similar to the profile of a football would work well. So find a short piece of large diameter aluminum pipe, make some lengthwise cuts, then weld two of them together to get your profile. For that matter, if you find it easier, use steel pipe and braze it with a torch. Find what works easiest and cheapest for you.

Or CNC the finished foil from G10 fiberglass, or from wood which you then paint with epoxy or glass over. You are probably going to have to make several of these as you refine your design. Cost, tooling, and time are your enemies. And PLEASE don’t say “carbon fiber” to me. Yes, CF is great, strong, etc. But it is expensive, requires knowledge and tooling to make the part properly, isn’t easy to modify when you need to make changes, and is too expensive to build several prototypes with unless you are wealthy.

Your hydrofoil design, fabrication, and testing is project enough. Most people never make it through and end up with a design they are happy with. Why complicate it with dangerous and expensive processes that have a low likelihood of success?

Sometimes the cheapest method that works is the one that seemed the most expensive during evaluation.

Date=12-12-15 Name:Scott Smith [Msgid=2483493] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
Watched Worlds Fastest Indian? 12-12-15

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Watched Worlds Fastest Indian? – (Scott Smith) 12-12-15 – 10:24 AM

Yes, you can absolutely cast your own struts. I did quite a bit of casting with aluminum bronze, stainless steel super-alloy, and some casting with aluminum. It is an endeavor though. There are a few methods you could use (for something as large as a strut).

General considerations: You will need a thermocouple temperature sensor (IR won’t work without special calibration). You will need twice as much aluminum for the pour, much will remain in the sprue to help mitigate how much the aluminum shrinks as it cools. Even if you get the gating, sprues, investing, burnout, raw material, pour temperature, etc. correct, you will still have issues. Voids, inclusions, deformation from shrinkage, porosity, etc. Without knowing the exact composition of the parts you are melting down you will have no control over the properties of the aluminum in the finished part. And this is just a simple overview.

Lost wax method: I did a LOT of this (over a million parts per year). It requires a lot of investment (plaster mold material), a big container to put it in, an even bigger oven to do the burn out. You will need a large crucible to melt all that aluminum, and pouring it will be DANGEROUS if you aren’t experienced. Improperly done molds can literally explode, flinging molten metal everywhere. We cast into flasks that were 4″ in diameter and 6″ long. We wore aluminized coats, gloves, and head coverings. Closed shoes, and special glasses to filter out the infrared. Between melting the aluminum, opening the furnace door to retrieve the mold, and performing the casting itself there is enough IR to damage your eyes. You can’t see IR, and once damaged your eyes are unlikely to recover. Shrinkage on a part that big will be very difficult to control. The amount of investment needed per part would be expensive, and you need a disposable pattern for every casting attempt. This type of casting works well for small parts (we used it to make the cutting ends of surgical devices) and can be VERY accurate. We used injection molded plastic patterns, if you wrote on the pattern with a pencil, you could read it after casting. It is the method used by most jewelers, but don’t forget that they don’t care about accuracy because they will hand polish afterward. It just isn’t practical for what you want. It is fun to do and can be done simply at home if you want to make really small parts, like jewelry.

Shell casting: The pattern is attached to a sprue. It is then dipped into a vat of liquid investment, then showered with investment powder. This forms a thin shell. The process is repeated over and over again, using different grades of investment to maintain shell porosity. Eventually the whole thing is put in a furnace and the pattern is burned out. The shell hardens into a ceramic mold. Again, uses a lot of investment, but not as much as the lost wax method. Time consuming. Same casting problems as mentioned before. A lot of things are shell-cast, but usually only as a rough casting to be machined later.

Sand Casting: A pattern is pressed into a box full of a special kind of sand, and then the pattern is removed. Two sided molds can be made this way also. The sand is typically cheaper than investment, and doesn’t need to be fired in a big furnace. Good detail can be produced if done properly. The pattern is reusable. This is better for your application than the lost wax method, but still takes knowledge, practice, and a good set-up. And there will still be issues with the final part.

Die casting is way too expensive for one-off parts, so I won’t go into it. Like a lot of things, the idea of casting your own aluminum struts sounds fairly simple and cheap, but it just isn’t. You WILL spend lots of time and money, and risk injury, to produce low quality parts.

Alternatives…

Sand casting: Yes, okay, sand casting. But don’t do it yourself. Find a shop (use the Thomas Register online) that makes cast aluminum furniture, or does small runs. Show them a preliminary drawing and let them help you to figure out the pattern and sprue. Unless you are good at it, let a CNC machine shop, or a sign shop with a router table cut your pattern, probably from wood. I wouldn’t do this unless you are sure your design won’t change, and you plan on making several parts.

Machining: Metal scrap yards don’t just buy aluminum, most will sell it back to you cheap. Large billets of aluminum aren’t common, but are sometimes available. Buy a piece of aluminum wherever you can, and have a machine shop CNC it to shape. Even at a few hundred dollars it’s probably cheaper than anything else you can do, and it will be accurate with no internal issues in the aluminum.

Forming: Buy some sheet aluminum and have it bent and welded to shape. That is how some of the rear struts on the Dynafoil were made. You might even be able to do it yourself. Design your strut based on this process, and you might be able to do it cheap. For example, since this is a strut, a simple symmetrical profile similar to the profile of a football would work well. So find a short piece of large diameter aluminum pipe, make some lengthwise cuts, then weld two of them together to get your profile. For that matter, if you find it easier, use steel pipe and braze it with a torch. Find what works easiest and cheapest for you.

Or CNC the finished foil from G10 fiberglass, or from wood which you then paint with epoxy or glass over. You are probably going to have to make several of these as you refine your design. Cost, tooling, and time are your enemies. And PLEASE don’t say “carbon fiber” to me. Yes, CF is great, strong, etc. But it is expensive, requires knowledge and tooling to make the part properly, isn’t easy to modify when you need to make changes, and is too expensive to build several prototypes with unless you are wealthy.

Your hydrofoil design, fabrication, and testing is project enough. Most people never make it through and end up with a design they are happy with. Why complicate it with dangerous and expensive processes that have a low likelihood of success?

Sometimes the cheapest method that works is the one that seemed the most expensive during evaluation.

Date=12-12-15 Name:Scott Smith [Msgid=2483493] ModifyMsg

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Performance by Design by Donald Blount – (White) 10-26-15 – 1:56 AM

Our last JOINT DINNER MEETING of SNAME SD-5 PANEL AND INTERNATIONAL HYDROFOIL SOCIETY was held , 21 October 2015.

The Topic was: “Performance by Design”: Hydrodynamics for High-Speed Vessels

by Donald L. Blount: President, DLBA.

He has made the presentation available for our members who could not attend.

(Click here to see it and our collection of IHS/SD5 meeting presentations)

General: IHS Administration
IHS/SD5 Dinner Meeting; 7 May 2015 04-17-15

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IHS/SD5 Dinner Meeting; 7 May 2015 – (Bill) 04-17-15 – 7:33 PM

Next JOINT DINNER MEETING of SNAME SD-5 PANEL AND INTERNATIONAL HYDROFOIL SOCIETY Thursday, 7 May 2015

At the Army Navy Country Club, Arlington, VA
From 5:30 to 6:30 Cash Bar – 6:30 to 7:30 Dinner – 7:30 to 8:30 Program

Romaine salad Grilled marinated chicken paillard with saffron cous cous and broccolini Chocolate mousse, Coffee & tea

Price: $35.00
To pay online, by 1 May, go to www.foils.org/meetings.htm

Make reservations by 4:00 Friday, 1 May with Allen Ford at allenford@verizon.net

Please honor reservations. No-shows may be requested to cover costs incurred. (http://www.foils.org/meetings.htm)

Topic: Ship to Shore Connector (SSC) Design Development /Evolution

Jay Howell: CSC Advanced Marine Center

Fully amphibious LCACs (Landing Craft, Air Cushion) were first delivered in December 1984 with a 60 short ton capacity and an expected service life of 20 years; 91 were acquired. In October 2006 the Navy formally commenced the SSC program to provide a functional LCAC replacement with the same “footprint”, a 74 short ton capacity, increased range, a 30 year service life, and improved reliability and maintainability. A significant design effort was applied to addressing the “Top 25” LCAC maintenance items, and the Navy employed a Set-Based Design process to optimize the selection of systems for the SSC. The Technology Readiness Assessment process was rigorously applied to ensure new technologies included would be fully ready. Mr. Howell will discuss some of the aspects of the early stage design development and how the SSC has evolved from the LCAC.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jay Howell graduated in June 1972 from Webb Institute of Naval Architecture, with a bachelor of science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering; he received a Master of Science in Ocean Engineering from MIT in 1975. Jay was a civilian employee of the Federal Government for most of his professional career, primarily with the Naval Ship Engineering Center and Naval Sea Systems Command but also including four years at USCG Headquarters. He has been with CSC since 2005 and is currently a Senior Engineering Consultant/Systems Engineering Advisor in the Concept Development Team of the Carriers and Amphibious Ship Division of the CSC Advanced Marine Center. He has over 44 years of surface ship design and R&D management experience in progressively more responsible positions, with a focus on early stage total surface ship system research and development, design and acquisition support. TextNext JOINT DINNER MEETING of SNAME SD-5 PANEL AND INTERNATIONAL HYDROFOIL SOCIETY Thursday, 7 May 2015

Date=04-17-15 Name:Bill [Msgid=2405522] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
homemade kneeboard foils 03-09-15

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homemade kneeboard foils – (Adam Auret) 03-09-15 – 5:42 AM

Dear Sir/Madam
My name is Adam Auret and I am 12 years old. My main hobby is design and technology. I am working on a foil project to fit to my kneeboard. My dad will tow me with his fishing boat . IT is not fast. My school will help me 3D print the foils.
I am e-mailing you to ask if you could help me to determine how big the foils should be. I am using a simple layout with a frame to fit to the board with foil on each side at the back and one v shape foil in front. If you think that this won’t work or you know of a better way then please let me know.
Here is a picture I used to get my dad to agree on this project.

I will be mounting it onto a body board or a kneeboard.
My dad helped me find the NACA 63-412 AIRFOIL (n63412-il) that works for sailboats so i will use this profile for the 3d printing. We will print in segments. The help I need is for the size of the foils width and length.

From Adam Auret
P.S. if you need my weight it is 37 kg.
please take into consideration that I am only 12.

Date=03-09-15 Name:Adam Auret [Msgid=2394955] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
Next IHS/SD5 Dinner mtg. 5 Feb 01-21-15

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Next IHS/SD5 Dinner mtg. 5 Feb – (Bill) 01-21-15 – 9:33 PM

http://www.foils.org/meetings.htm

Next JOINT DINNER MEETING of SNAME SD-5 PANEL AND INTERNATIONAL HYDROFOIL SOCIETY

Thursday, 5 February 2015
At the Army Navy Country Club, Arlington, VA
From 5:30 to 6:30 Cash Bar – 6:30 to 7:30 Dinner – 7:30 to 8:30 Program

Romaine salad Grilled marinated chicken paillard with saffron cous cous and broccolini
Chocolate mousse, Coffee & tea

Price: $35.00

To pay online, by 30 January, go to www.foils.org/meetings.htm

Make reservations by noon Friday, 30 January with Allen Ford at allenford@verizon.net

Please honor reservations. No-shows may be requested to cover costs incurred.

(Download Announcement here)
Topic: Unmanned Applications of Advanced Marine Vehicles in the U.S. Navy

by Michael Bosworth
PEO LCS Science and Technology Director

Advanced Marine Vehicles have found a number of applications in naval service, notably
SWATHs for high seakeeping, hydrofoils and trimarans for small combatants, and hovercraft for
amphibious lighterage. A newly emerging area of development is unmanned maritime systems
(surface or underwater). USVs and UUVs are less developed and less transitioned as a class
than Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV), with energy and autonomy/communications issues to
overcome, respectively. But unmanned maritime systems represent a grand opportunity for
AMV concepts, if they can translate from manned concepts to often smaller unmanned concepts.
Mr. Bosworth will discuss some emerging UMS missions and needs and opportunities, then lead
a short discussion session about the melding of AMVs and UMS’s as a developmental tool.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mike Bosworth graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1976 and spent 20 years in uniform in
a wide variety of positions, first as a Surface Warfare Officer and then an Engineering Duty
Officer. Midway through he attended MIT for a master’s in Naval Architecture and Marine
Engineering and the degree of Ocean Engineer. After retiring in 1996 he worked at Syntek
Technologies for 6 years before returning to NAVSEA, where he has spent the past 13 years
building surface ship and craft concept design, and R&D management and transition capabilities,
in NAVSEA 05D and 05T. He recently left as deputy of 05T (the NAVSEA corporate CTO
group) to take the position of Science and Technology Director for PEO LCS (which includes
LCS, the new frigate derivative, mine warfare, and unmanned maritime systems).

Date=01-21-15 Name:Bill [Msgid=2383359] ModifyMsg

General: IHS Administration
Mandles Prize for Hydrofoil 2015 11-04-14

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Mandles Prize for Hydrofoil 2015 – (Bill) 11-04-14 – 11:24 PM

—— Announcement ——

International Hydrofoil Society (IHS)

Mandles Prize for Hydrofoil Excellence

2014 – 2015

The International Hydrofoil Society is pleased to announce that thanks to the generosity of Mr. Martinn Mandles, a long-time member of IHS and his wife Connie, IHS will once again sponsor the Mandles Prize for Hydrofoil Excellence competition.

The competition includes up to $4,500 a year in IHS hydrofoil achievement prizes for students, with a $2,500 First Prize and up to two $1,000 Honorable Mention awards.

In order to open the competition to a wider spectrum of qualified entries, submissions by students based on work completed since 2010 will be eligible for the Mandles Prize. The Due Date for Entry Forms is March 15, 2015.

This is an outstanding opportunity for the next generation of hydrofoil developers to be acknowledged for their efforts to advance the state of the art in hydrofoil and hydrofoil-assisted craft engineering, design and construction. Background on the Mandles Prize and Rules for the competition can be downloaded from the IHS website (www.foils.org)

Based on the 2013 – 2014 entries, we once again anticipate a very exciting competition and look forward to receiving many high-quality entries

Questions on the Mandles Prize can be e-mailed to: prizechair@foils.org

Date=11-04-14 Name:Bill [Msgid=2356153] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
Next JOINT DINNER MEETING 16 Oct 2014 09-17-14

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Next JOINT DINNER MEETING 16 Oct 2014 – (Bill) 09-17-14 – 11:40 AM

Next JOINT DINNER MEETING of SNAME SD-5 PANEL AND INTERNATIONAL HYDROFOIL SOCIETY

Will be held Thursday,16 October 2014

At the Army Navy Country Club, Arlington, VA
From 5:30 to 6:30 Cash Bar – 6:30 to 7:30 Dinner – 7:30 to 8:30 Program

Deli Buffet: Hot Soup; Mix of Breads & Rolls; Sliced Beef, Ham & Turkey, Cheeses; Pasta, Potato & Green Salads; Brownies & Cookies; Coffee & Tea

Price: $30.00
To pay online, by 10 October, go to www.foils.org/meeting.htm

Make reservations by noon Friday, 10 October with Allen Ford at allenford@verizon.net or Bill Hockberger at w.hockberger@verizon.net

Please honor reservations. No-shows may be requested to cover costs incurred.
Topic: 50 Years of Hovercraft in the USA Put into Perspective
Speaker: Warwick Jacobs, Trustee, the Hovercraft Museum

Although the hovercraft was officially invented in the UK back in 1955, the US has had a long
association with it and has now seen half a century of activity and contributions to it. From
GEMs (Ground Effect Machines) to ACVs (Air Cushion Vehicles) to SES (Surface Effect
Ships), the “hover craft” has had a presence in the US, and Warwick will discuss both its
military and civilian roles and explain the successes and failures. From the San Francisco ferries
and Vietnam conflict in the 1960s to the dream of a 100-knot Navy to present day giant military
craft worldwide, he will trace the rich diversity of hovercraft and what the future may hold. He’ll
touch on today’s hovercraft sporting and cruising clubs and their great differences from the UK.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Warwick Jacobs is a trustee of the Hovercraft Museum in England and one of its founders. The
Museum now has over 70 full-size craft, including the SR.N4, the largest civilian hovercraft ever
built. He has been a hovercraft enthusiast from the age of four and has seen (and now acquired)
many of them. He knew Sir Christopher Cockerell, the hovercraft inventor, and was even
commissioned to paint his portrait (he’s also a professional painter). Earlier he worked with the
ferry operator Hovertravel and cofounded and ran the company HoverHire. In 2012 he helped
HoverAid in southern Madagascar with their Hovering Doctor service.
Warwick’s University of London degree specialized in transport geography, his thesis being
“The Hovercraft and the Difficulty in Finding a Modal Role.” He was for 15 years the honorary
Secretary of the Hovercraft Society.

Date=09-17-14 Name:Bill [Msgid=2340635] ModifyMsg

General: IHS Administration
Next JOINT DINNER MEETING 16 Oct 2014 09-17-14

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Next JOINT DINNER MEETING 16 Oct 2014 – (Bill) 09-17-14 – 11:40 AM

Next JOINT DINNER MEETING of SNAME SD-5 PANEL AND INTERNATIONAL HYDROFOIL SOCIETY

Will be held Thursday,16 October 2014

At the Army Navy Country Club, Arlington, VA
From 5:30 to 6:30 Cash Bar – 6:30 to 7:30 Dinner – 7:30 to 8:30 Program

Deli Buffet: Hot Soup; Mix of Breads & Rolls; Sliced Beef, Ham & Turkey, Cheeses; Pasta, Potato & Green Salads; Brownies & Cookies; Coffee & Tea

Price: $30.00
To pay online, by 10 October, go to www.foils.org/meeting.htm

Make reservations by noon Friday, 10 October with Allen Ford at allenford@verizon.net or Bill Hockberger at w.hockberger@verizon.net

Please honor reservations. No-shows may be requested to cover costs incurred.
Topic: 50 Years of Hovercraft in the USA Put into Perspective
Speaker: Warwick Jacobs, Trustee, the Hovercraft Museum

Although the hovercraft was officially invented in the UK back in 1955, the US has had a long
association with it and has now seen half a century of activity and contributions to it. From
GEMs (Ground Effect Machines) to ACVs (Air Cushion Vehicles) to SES (Surface Effect
Ships), the “hover craft” has had a presence in the US, and Warwick will discuss both its
military and civilian roles and explain the successes and failures. From the San Francisco ferries
and Vietnam conflict in the 1960s to the dream of a 100-knot Navy to present day giant military
craft worldwide, he will trace the rich diversity of hovercraft and what the future may hold. He’ll
touch on today’s hovercraft sporting and cruising clubs and their great differences from the UK.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Warwick Jacobs is a trustee of the Hovercraft Museum in England and one of its founders. The
Museum now has over 70 full-size craft, including the SR.N4, the largest civilian hovercraft ever
built. He has been a hovercraft enthusiast from the age of four and has seen (and now acquired)
many of them. He knew Sir Christopher Cockerell, the hovercraft inventor, and was even
commissioned to paint his portrait (he’s also a professional painter). Earlier he worked with the
ferry operator Hovertravel and cofounded and ran the company HoverHire. In 2012 he helped
HoverAid in southern Madagascar with their Hovering Doctor service.
Warwick’s University of London degree specialized in transport geography, his thesis being
“The Hovercraft and the Difficulty in Finding a Modal Role.” He was for 15 years the honorary
Secretary of the Hovercraft Society.

Date=09-17-14 Name:Bill [Msgid=2340635] ModifyMsg

General: IHS Administration
hydrovane torpedo boat 07-12-14

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hydrovane torpedo boat – (yoichi ) 07-12-14 – 12:39 AM

Hi. All
I am looking for the data of the hydrovane torpedo boat of the old German navy.
Probably it has not actually recognized existence with the torpedo boat under concept.
The hydrovane is attached before and after the hull of a spindle shape form .
External equipment of the torpedo of one shot is carried out at the hull lower part.
Promotion is a propeller.
Someone? Please inform me, if it knows.

Date=07-12-14 Name:yoichi [Msgid=2323861] ModifyMsg

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General: IHS Administration
hydrovane torpedo boat (yoichi ) 07-12-14
Modelling WW2 German Hydrofoil Concept (Martin) 07-16-14

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Modelling WW2 German Hydrofoil Concept – (Martin) 07-16-14 – 8:16 AM

Hello Yoichi,

I think I know the hydrofoil design to which you refer. Does it look something like the images at the following sites:

http://www.german-navy.de/kriegsmarine/ships/fastattack/tb5/index.html http://www.german-navy.de/kriegsmarine/ships/fastattack/tb5c/index.html
http://www.german-navy.de/kriegsmarine/ships/fastattack/tb5b/index.html

As far as I know, such designs were only concepts and never built (except one small scale non-naval craft built after the war). I also came across images of such concepts in a book, possibly on German WW2 naval vessels developments.

There is a good discussion on the WW2 German hydrofoils by Bob Johnson at:

http://www.foils.org/trag.htm

However this doesn’t include these craft.

The following page also has more on such developments:

http://www.foils.org/pioneers.htm

Including under the heading: World War II German Fast Attack Hydrofoil Craft

Many years ago, under the same page, but further down, Christof Schramm had written of his knowledge of German hydrofoil projects under the heading: Luerssen Hydrofoils [4 Mar 01, updated 6 Apr 02]

In this he includes some photos of hydrofoils developed in Germany in the post-war years, including a version of the “Wenddelsches Schnellschiff” (transl. Fastship), developed by Professor Wenddel for which an experimental prototype exists in the collection of the German Navigation Museum in Bremerhaven, Germany. See:

http://www.foils.org/schramm.pdf

Good luck with finding more details.

Perhaps you can post an image of the hydrofoil you are hoping to model in case it isn’t similar to one of the ones described above.

Date=07-16-14 Name:Martin [Msgid=2324932] ModifyMsg

General: IHS Administration
hydrovane torpedo boat (yoichi ) 07-12-14
Modelling WW2 German Hydrofoil Concept (Martin) 07-16-14

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Modelling WW2 German Hydrofoil Concept – (Martin) 07-16-14 – 8:16 AM

Hello Yoichi,

I think I know the hydrofoil design to which you refer. Does it look something like the images at the following sites:

http://www.german-navy.de/kriegsmarine/ships/fastattack/tb5/index.html http://www.german-navy.de/kriegsmarine/ships/fastattack/tb5c/index.html
http://www.german-navy.de/kriegsmarine/ships/fastattack/tb5b/index.html

As far as I know, such designs were only concepts and never built (except one small scale non-naval craft built after the war). I also came across images of such concepts in a book, possibly on German WW2 naval vessels developments.

There is a good discussion on the WW2 German hydrofoils by Bob Johnson at:

http://www.foils.org/trag.htm

However this doesn’t include these craft.

The following page also has more on such developments:

http://www.foils.org/pioneers.htm

Including under the heading: World War II German Fast Attack Hydrofoil Craft

Many years ago, under the same page, but further down, Christof Schramm had written of his knowledge of German hydrofoil projects under the heading: Luerssen Hydrofoils [4 Mar 01, updated 6 Apr 02]

In this he includes some photos of hydrofoils developed in Germany in the post-war years, including a version of the “Wenddelsches Schnellschiff” (transl. Fastship), developed by Professor Wenddel for which an experimental prototype exists in the collection of the German Navigation Museum in Bremerhaven, Germany. See:

http://www.foils.org/schramm.pdf

Good luck with finding more details.

Perhaps you can post an image of the hydrofoil you are hoping to model in case it isn’t similar to one of the ones described above.

Date=07-16-14 Name:Martin [Msgid=2324932] ModifyMsg

[Replies to this message, if any, are listed below.]

General: IHS Administration
hydrovane torpedo boat (yoichi ) 07-12-14
Modelling WW2 German Hydrofoil Concept (Martin) 07-16-14
hydrofoil torpedo boat Pix.add (yoichi takahashi) 07-18-14

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hydrofoil torpedo boat Pix.add – (yoichi takahashi) 07-18-14 – 3:06 AM

Hi. Martin san.
Thank you for the comment detailed to me.
The ship applicable although I looked at it all was not found.
The indistinct picture of the hydrofoil torpedo boat of the old German navy which I am looking for was raised below.

http://d.hatena.ne.jp/skyex/

this ship is a concept proposal — or is it the ship which actually suited?
It is a mystery.

Date=07-18-14 Name:yoichi takahashi [Msgid=2325345] ModifyMsg

General: IHS Administration
hydrovane torpedo boat (yoichi ) 07-12-14
Modelling WW2 German Hydrofoil Concept (Martin) 07-16-14
German WW2 hydrofoil concept? (Martin) 07-20-14

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German WW2 hydrofoil concept? – (Martin) 07-20-14 – 6:28 AM

Hello Yoichi san,

I have not seen any images of such a hydrofoil before. Is this image from the cover of a plastic model kit? Do you have a higher resolution image of this hydrofoil concept? It is hard to get a good impression of it.

Regards,

Martin

Date=07-20-14 Name:Martin [Msgid=2325808] ModifyMsg

Hi. Martin san.
Thank you for the comment detailed to me.
The ship applicable although I looked at it all was not found.
The indistinct picture of the hydrofoil torpedo boat of the old German navy which I am looking for was raised below.

http://d.hatena.ne.jp/skyex/

this ship is a concept proposal — or is it the ship which actually suited?
It is a mystery.
German WW2 hydrofoil concept? – (Martin) 07-20-14 – 6:28 AM

Hello Yoichi san,

I have not seen any images of such a hydrofoil before. Is this image from the cover of a plastic model kit? Do you have a higher resolution image of this hydrofoil concept? It is hard to get a good impression of it.

Regards,

Martin
German WW2 hydrofoil concept? – (yoichi takahashi) 07-21-14 – 10:21 AM

Hi!. Martin san.
Thank you for your reply.

several months before — the auction of the Internet — this — plastic model discovery was carried out.
http://hobbyworld.aoshima-bk.co.jp/AFYM0090_syohin_detail.aspx?scode=AVS14041001 />
Since the style made sense, this considered the model which exists really.
Possibly, it may be a plastic model maker’s imagination article.

Date=07-21-14 Name:yoichi takahashi [Msgid=2326011]Click here to Modify or Delete this message

Congratulations – (Brett Curtis) 06-30-14 – 5:49 PM

Hi Andrew, great construction and pics. I can’t help but I can congratulate you on your idea and success.
Date=06-30-14 Name:Brett Curtis [Msgid=2320802]

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